How Many Sides Does a Gazebo Have? [ANSWERED]


Gazebos can have 3-8 sides or no sides at all. Most gazebos are unrestricted in the number of sides they can have except for rotundas, oval gazebos, and pavilions, which are a subtype of gazebo. Except for these few types, gazebos can have as many sides 8 as requested by the property owner. The more sides a gazebo is constructed with, the more expensive it will be.

This is a confusing question because there are so many different styles of gazebo, and if you want to be sure of what gazebo you want, you need to know if there are rules for which gazebo has how many sides. Besides, there are many structures similar to a gazebo and it’s possible what you thought was just a 4-sided gazebo was actually a pavilion.

So if you, as a homeowner, want to make sure you have the right structure in mind and are interested in the variety you can have with a gazebo, read on!

Wedding gazebo with 8 sides
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Related Reading: Pergolas, Ramadas, And Gazebos – What’s the Difference?

What Defines a Gazebo?

A Gazebo is a roofed outdoor structure that is detached from the main building and gives an open view of the surrounding scenery and open fresh air on all sides. They are most commonly used for the relaxation of the owner and guests and are fitted with furniture such as sitting areas and small coffee tables.

They differ from similar structures such as pergolas in their general design, such as offering total shade while a pergola offers partial shade and even a retractable roof altogether. Gazebos are commonly placed above ground level and designed with a railing or half wall all around, but this isn’t the case all of the time.

How Many Sides Do Gazebos Have?

A gazebo will be made with anywhere from no sides at all to somewhere between 3-8 sides! The number of sides your gazebo has will depend on the design you want, the shape of the gazebo you want, and/or the amount of money you can spend. So, let’s take a look at these three factors individually.

The Design of the Gazebo

Some types of gazebos require a specific number of sides because their styles require them.

Rotundas are circular gazebos, but in order to be circular, the gazebo must have no sides whatsoever. They are usually constructed with a series of stone pillars in a circle that supports a solid brick or concrete roof.

Like rotundas, oval-shaped gazebos have no sides in order to meet that description, but they are usually made like classic gazebos, with wood or metal.

Triangle gazebos will naturally have three sides and are modern additions to the gazebo family.

Pavilions are types of gazebos that usually have four sides to have as open a view as possible on each side and be unrestrictive by not having a railing.

Those are the only four types of gazebos that seem to have a set number of sides.

The Shape of the Gazebo

Except for the four types we’ve mentioned, gazebos are very flexible with the number of sides they are constructed with. It will ultimately depend on you to decide how many sides you want.

Do you want a circular or oval-shaped gazebo? Then you want no sides and either a rotunda or oval gazebo. Do you love modern shapes and styles and want 3 sides? A Triangle gazebo is for you.

Do you want a rectangular or square gazebo? You want four sides. A 5-sided gazebo would mean that you’re looking for a pentagonal gazebo, 6 sides would be a hexagonal gazebo, 7 sides would be a heptagonal gazebo, and 8 sides would be an octagonal gazebo.

Can you have more sides? As a matter of fact, you can, but be warned that it’s quite expensive. It isn’t common to see 9, 10, or 11-sided gazebos, but if you want one with 12 sides these are known as dodecahedron gazebos. A gazebo with this many sides is never small because it would be both impractical and unenjoyable as a large number of beams would just block the view.

Odds are, if you are imagining the kind of gazebo that everyone usually associates with the word, the ones with many sides, a roof that comes to a point, decorative arches, and a railing, then you want at least five sides.

The Price of the Gazebo

How much are you willing to pay for your gazebo? This will absolutely affect your options with the number of sides your gazebo gets. The prices below are the cost given by one company and may differ based on other companies and locations. You should find a local company and ask for a quote for a more reliable price list. The ranges you see are affected by factors of size, ornamentation, and of course number of sides, all of which add complexity.

A round gazebo can cost between $3,000 – $8,000. This is the cheapest end of the price spectrum because they are the simplest structures.

Oval gazebos can be between $,3000-$9,000. They are a little more expensive than round gazebos because they are longer shapes, which means they take more area, more resources, and more labor.

A triangle gazebo costs $3,500-$9,000. They aren’t smaller by any means, but tend to feel more open and are popular right now.

Square or rectangular gazebos are between $3,000-$10,000.

Hexagonal gazebos would be between $5,000-$11,000.

Octagonal gazebos can be between $5,000-$12,000.

Finally, if you are determined to have a 12-sided Gazebo, it might cost you somewhere between $10,000-$14,000.

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Continue Reading: Install a Gazebo Without Drilling Into Concrete [HERE’S HOW]

Conclusion

A gazebo is one of those structures that gives the designer a lot of freedom for creativity. In addition to the number of sides you can have, keep in mind that it’s the number of sides as well as the architectural design such as roof choice, and extra decorations that make it a beautiful park or backyard piece.

Stuart

Stuart loves blogging about his hobbies and passions. Living the Outdoor Life is a place for him to share what he learns while creating his perfect outdoor space.

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